Core BCAA+ HICA By VITACORE

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  • Accelerates muscle repair and recovery*
  • Reduces exercise induced muscle soreness (DOMS)*
  • Aids in lean mass growth*
  • Ignites muscle protein synthesis*
  • Improves subsequent exercise performance*
  • Maintains muscle fluid balance*
  • 40 servings per container
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Product Description

Core BCAA + HICA™ floods your body with efficacious amounts of instantized branched chain amino acids, glutamine, taurine, and a full 500mg of HICA. These ingredients work in perfect synergy to help muscles repair, recover and rebuild from strenuous training sessions. When the body is working hard, it is at risk of moving into a negative nitrogen balance, or catabolic (muscle breakdown) state. Consuming amino acids, specifically BCAAs, before or after exercise prevents and even reverses this effect…. helping to push your performance to the next level. HICA is the end result of leucine metabolism in human tissues and primarily functions to reduce muscle breakdown. Studies have shown that HICA can enhance anaerobic and aerobic performance as well as help to promote optimal gains in muscle mass and muscle fiber size. However, the biggest benefit of HICA can be the reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Core BCAA + HICA™ is perfect combination of amino acids to reduce muscle breakdown, accelerate recovery, and support an increase in lean body mass.

Key Ingredients/Benefits:

  • 5000mg BCAAs in a 3:1:1 ratio – Shown to promote muscle growth, recovery, and reduce training related soreness. BCAAs have also been shown to increase energy and blunt fatigue during exercise.
  • 3000mg Taurine – Improves time to exhaustion, VO2 max, and maximal workload.
  • 1000mg L-Glutamine – Glutamine is used in numerous bodily processes, including muscle anabolism, gluconeogenesis, nutrient absorption, and immunity.
  • 500mg HICA – Shown to increase whole lean body mass and reduce muscle soreness by 23% over a 4-week period compared to placebo.
  • 299mg Electrolytes – Helps maintain fluid balance in the muscle, facilitate motor neuron function and aid in recovery.

Ingredient Profile : 

REPAIR AND RECOVERY MATRIX:

BCAAs (as a whole):

The essential amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine collectively form what is referred to as the Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs). These amino acids are essential because they cannot be produced in the body and must be provided though supplementation or diet. BCAAs comprise approximately 30% of the total muscle protein pool and are the primary amino acids oxidized in the muscle during exercise and catabolic stress. For these reasons athletes supplement with BCAAs for the purpose of increasing muscle mass, reducing muscle damage, blunting fatigue, and increasing energy during exercise.

• Hundreds of studies exist on the ergogenic benefits of BCAAs. The majority of them show that BCAAs, whether consumed pre, during, or post-exercise; decrease protein catabolism (breakdown) and support muscle protein synthesis…a physiological process responsible for muscle growth and repair. Furthermore, BCAAs are vitally important to glucose (energy) production; contributing to greater than 40% of glucose production during sustained endurance exercise.
• A study done in 2009 found that subjects who supplemented with BCAAs while following an 8-week resistance training program had a greater decrease in body fat, an increase in lean mass, and greater strength gains on the bench press and squat compared to the non-BCAA group.

L-Leucine:

Leucine is one of the essential branched chain amino acids (BCAA). By itself it can stimulate muscle protein synthesis; the process responsible for muscle growth and recovery. This is why it is often referred to as the “main” amino acid.

• Supplementation with at least 2/grams daily leucine has been shown decrease muscle soreness, lessen recovery time between workouts, and increase lean muscle mass.
• Howatson et al. (2012) discovered that leucine (combined with isoleucine and valine) administered before muscle damaging resistance exercises reduced indices of muscle damage and accelerated recovery in resistance trained males.

L-Isoleucine:

Isoleucine, like leucine, is another BCAA that can stimulate muscle protein synthesis, but to a lesser when not combined with the other BCAAs. However, Isoleucine significantly increases glucose uptake and the usage of glucose during exercise; leading to greater energy production.

• Isoleucine may also play in role in the fat burning abilities of BCAAs.
• Nishimura et al. (2010) found that mice consuming a high fat diet in conjunction with isoleucine gained less fat mass than mice not receiving isoleucine. This was due to isoleucine’s ability to stimulate receptors (PPAR) that inhibit fat storage and increase fat burning.

L-Valine:

Valine, the third BCAA, promotes muscular endurance and decrease fatigue during exercise.

• When exercising tryptophan is converted to serotonin and signals the brain that the body is fatigued…ultimately leading to a decrease in muscle strength and endurance
• Since Valine competes with tryptophan for entry into the brain, and prevails, less serotonin gets to the brain; ultimately leading to stronger muscular contractions, quicker recovery between sets, and prolonged muscular strength and endurance.

L-Glutamine:

L-glutamine is the most prevalent free amino acid in plasma and one of the most prevalent found in muscle tissue.

• L-Glutamine stimulates muscle protein synthesis and is effective at replenishing energy for muscles (glycogen) after exhaustive exercise which may lead to quicker recovery.
• L-Glutamine may also increase cell volumization (hydration) and lead to increases in muscle hypertrophy.
• L-Glutamine may also reduce protein breakdown and support immune function.
• Lehmkuhl et al. (2003) found individual supplementing with glutamine and creatine monohydrate for 8 weeks increased body mass, lean body mass and initial rate of power production compared to placebo.

L-Taurine:

Taurine, has a myriad of benefits. From helping the body to metabolize fat, improving insulin sensitivity, raising testosterone levels, as an antioxidant, higher performance and quicker recovery during athletic training and increasing cardiovascular health… it goes without saying that Taurine is a great ingredient to have in your wheelhouse.

• Zhang et al. (2004) found that individuals who supplemented with taurine for 1 week before an exhaustive exercise bout significantly improved time to exhaustion, VO2 max, and maximal workload. It also decreased exercise induced DNA damage.

DL-a-hydroxy-isocaproic acid (HICA):

HICA is short for DL-Alpha-Hydroxy-Isocaproic Acidand is the end result of leucine metabolism in human tissues.

• Studies have shown that HICA can enhance anaerobic and aerobic performance as well as help to promote optimal gains in muscle mass and muscle fiber size.
• However, the biggest benefit of HICA can be the reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).
• Mero et. al (2010) discovered male soccer players who supplemented with HICA over a 4 week period were able to increase whole lean body mass and reduce soreness by 23% compared to placebo.

ELECTROLYTE REPLENISHMENT MATRIX

Potassium:

Potassium is a mineral found in varying amounts in almost all foods.

• It is needed for building and keeping strong bones.
• It also helps control the amount of calcium in the body and urine.
• If potassium levels get too high or too low, the heart and nervous system completely shut down. Many people in the U.S. often fail to obtain optimal amounts of this nutrient, and pay a health cost for it.

Calcium:

Calcium is an electrolyte that is necessary for many functions, especially muscle contraction.

• Therefore, the level of calcium in the blood has to be kept in a narrow range at all times.
• If the blood calcium level drops, then the bones will release calcium until an optimal level is once again achieved. However, this compromises the strength of the bones.
• Importantly, calcium is lost in sweat, so prolonged exercise requires calcium replenishment.

Magnesium:

Magnesium is an essential mineral and electrolyte. It is involved in protein synthesis, ATP formation, metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, and bone strength.
• Magnesium deficiencies are the second most common deficiency in developed countries. A lack of magnesium will raise blood pressure and reduce insulin sensitivity.
• Increases in free and total testosterone have been noted in sedentary and athletic populations when supplementing with magnesium supplementation. It also acts as a muscle relaxer and may improve aerobic performance.
• Brilla et al. (1992) discovered 26 untrained subjects who participated in a 7 week strength training program in conjunction with magnesium supplementation were able to increase testosterone relative to baseline.

Q: What is the best way to take Core BCAA + HICA?
A: As a dietary supplement take one serving 1 to 2 times daily.

Q: When is the best time to take Core BCAA + HICA?
A: Immediately pre and post workout as well as in between meals in order to maximally stimulate muscle protein synthesis throughout the day (promotes muscle recovery and repair).

Q: What are BCAAs?
A: The branched chain amino acids are collectively made up of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. They are essential amino acids that cannot be produced by the body and can only be obtained through diet or supplementation. The BCAAs are the primary drivers behind muscle protein synthesis; arguably the most important physiological process for maximal muscle growth and recovery.

References : 

BCAAs (Leucine, Isoleucine, Valine)
1. Norton, L. E., & Layman, D. K. (2006). Leucine regulates translation initiation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle after exercise. The Journal of nutrition, 136(2), 533S-537S.
2. Shimomura, Y., Inaguma, A., Watanabe, S., Yamamoto, Y., Muramatsu, Y., Bajotto, G., … & Mawatari, K. (2010). Branched-chain amino acid supplementation before squat exercise and delayed-onset muscle soreness. International journal of sport nutrition, 20(3), 236.
3. Gualano, A. B., Bozza, T., Lopes, D. C. P., Roschel, H., Dos Santos, C. A., Luiz, M. M., … & Herbert, L. J. A. (2011). Branched-chain amino acids supplementation enhances exercise capacity and lipid oxidation during endurance exercise after muscle glycogen depletion. The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness, 51(1), 82-88.
4. Hamel, F. G., Upward, J. L., Siford, G. L., & Duckworth, W. C. (2003). Inhibition of proteasome activity by selected amino acids. Metabolism, 52(7), 805-809.
5. Nicastro, H., Artioli, G. G., dos Santos Costa, A., Solis, M. Y., Da Luz, C. R., Blachier, F., & Lancha Jr, A. H. (2011). An overview of the therapeutic effects of leucine supplementation on skeletal muscle under atrophic conditions. Amino Acids, 40(2), 287-300.
6. Ra, S. G., Miyazaki, T., Ishikura, K., Nagayama, H., Suzuki, T., Maeda, S., … & Ohmori, H. (2013). Additional effects of taurine on the benefits of BCAA intake for the delayed-onset muscle soreness and muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric exercise. In Taurine 8 (pp. 179-187). Springer New York.
7. Stoppani, J., Scheett, T. P., Pena, J., Rudolph, C., Charlebois, D., & Charleston, S. C. (2009). Consuming branched-chain amino acid supplement during a resistance training program increases lean mass, muscle strength and fat loss. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 6(Suppl 1), P1.

Glutamine:
1. Welbourne, T. C. (1995). “Increased plasma bicarbonate and growth hormone after an oral glutamine load”. The American journal of clinical nutrition 61 (5): 1058–1061.
2. Morlion, B. J.; Stehle, P.; Wachtler, P.; Siedhoff, H. P.; Köller, M.; König, W.; Fürst, P.; Puchstein, C. (1998). “Total Parenteral Nutrition with Glutamine Dipeptide After Major Abdominal Surgery”. Annals of Surgery 227 (2): 302–308.
3. Lee, W. J.; Hawkins, R. A.; Viña, J. R.; Peterson, D. R. (1998). “Glutamine transport by the blood-brain barrier: A possible mechanism for nitrogen removal”. The American journal of physiology 274
4. Todorova, V. K., Kaufmann, Y., Luo, S., & Klimberg, V. S. (2011). Tamoxifen and raloxifene suppress the proliferation of estrogen receptor-negative cells through inhibition of glutamine uptake. [Research Support, U.S. Gov’t, Non-P.H.S.]. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, 67(2), 285-291.
5. Bowtell, J. L., Gelly, K., Jackman, M. L., Patel, A., Simeoni, M., & Rennie, M. J. (1999). Effect of oral glutamine on whole body carbohydrate storage during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology,86(6), 1770-1777.

Taurine:
1. Zhang, M., Izumi, I., Kagamimori, S., Sokejima, S., Yamagami, T., Liu, Z., & Qi, B. (2004). Role of taurine supplementation to prevent exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy young men. Amino acids, 26(2), 203-207.
2. BOUCHAMA, A., YUSUF, A., AL-SEDAIRY, S. U. L. T. A. N., & EL-YAZIGI, A. D. N. A. N. (1993). Alteration of taurine homeostasis in acute heatstroke.Critical care medicine, 21(4), 551-554.
3. Gwacham, N., & Wagner, D. R. (2012). Acute effects of a caffeine-taurine energy drink on repeated sprint performance of American college football players. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 22(2), 109-116.
4. Warskulat, U., Brookmann, S., Felsner, I., Brenden, H., Grether‐Beck, S., & Häussinger, D. (2008). Ultraviolet A induces transport of compatible organic osmolytes in human dermal fibroblasts. Experimental dermatology, 17(12), 1031-1036.

HICA:
1. Mero, A. A., Ojala, T., Hulmi, J. J., Puurtinen, R., Karila, T. A., & Seppälä, T. (2010). Effects of alfa-hydroxy-isocaproic acid on body composition, DOMS and performance in athletes. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 8.
2. Mero, A. A., Ojala, T., Hulmi, J. J., Puurtinen, R., Karila, T. A., & Seppälä, T. (2010). Effects of alfa-hydroxy-isocaproic acid on body composition, DOMS and performance in athletes. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 8.
3. Tischler, M. E., Desautels, M., & Goldberg, A. L. (1982). Does leucine, leucyl-tRNA, or some metabolite of leucine regulate protein synthesis and degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscle. J Biol Chem, 257(4), 1613-1621.
4. Jakobs, C., Sweetman, L., & Nyhan, W. L. (1984). Hydroxy acid metabolites of branched-chain amino acids in amniotic fluid. Clinica chimica acta, 140(2), 157-166.

Potassium:
1. Kanbay, M., Bayram, Y., Solak, Y., & Sanders, P. W. (2013). Dietary potassium: A key mediator of the cardiovascular response to dietary sodium chloride. Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, 7(5), 395-400.
2. Zhou, X., Zhang, Z., Shin, M. K., Horwitz, S. B., Levorse, J. M., Zhu, L., … & Pan, Y. (2013). Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure. Hypertension, 62(2), 288-294.

Calcium:
1. Barry et al. 2011; Acute Calcium Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-induced Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis
2. Paschoal et al. 2004; Nutritional status of Brazilian elite swimmers.
3. Venderley et al. 2006; Vegetarian diets : nutritional considerations for athletes.
4. Maughan et al. 2007; Nutrition and hydration concerns of the female football player.
5. Clarkson et al. 1995; Exercise and mineral status of athletes: calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron.
6. Cinar et al. 2008; Testosterone levels in athletes at rest and exhaustion: effects of calcium supplementation.

Magnesium:
1. Cinar, V., Polat, Y., Baltaci, A. K., & Mogulkoc, R. (2011). Effects of magnesium supplementation on testosterone levels of athletes and sedentary subjects at rest and after exhaustion. Biological trace element research, 140(1), 18-23.
2. van der Plas, A. A., Schilder, J. C., Marinus, J., & van Hilten, J. J. (2013). An explanatory study evaluating the muscle relaxant effects of intramuscular magnesium sulphate for dystonia in complex regional pain syndrome. The Journal of Pain, 14(11), 1341-1348.
3. Hatzistavri, L. S., Sarafidis, P. A., Georgianos, P. I., Tziolas, I. M., Aroditis, C. P., Zebekakis, P. E., … & Lasaridis, A. N. (2009). Oral magnesium supplementation reduces ambulatory blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. American journal of hypertension, 22(10), 1070-1075.
4. Golf, S. W., Bender, S., & Grüttner, J. (1998). On the significance of magnesium in extreme physical stress. Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy,12(2), 197-202.
5. Carpenter, T. O., DeLucia, M. C., Zhang, J. H., Bejnerowicz, G., Tartamella, L., Dziura, J., … & Cohen, D. (2006). A randomized controlled study of effects of dietary magnesium oxide supplementation on bone mineral content in healthy girls. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 91(12), 4866-4872.
6. Held, K., Antonijevic, I. A., Künzel, H., Uhr, M., Wetter, T. C., Golly, I. C., … & Murck, H. (2002). Oral Mg (2+) supplementation reverses age-related neuroendocrine and sleep EEG changes in humans. Pharmacopsychiatry,35(4), 135-143.
7. Brilla, L. R., & Haley, T. F. (1992). Effect of magnesium supplementation on strength training in humans. Journal of the American College of Nutrition,11(3), 326-329.

Nutritional Info

CORE BCAA + HICA

Additional Information

Size

440G – 40 SERVE

Flavour

BOMBPOP, MANGO ICE

Shaker

Suppkings 700ml

1 review for Core BCAA+ HICA By VITACORE


  1. 5 out of 5


    :

    purchased this product 2 weeks ago , awesome flavour love the Mango works really well swapped from Xtend to this and don’t think I will go back thanks Guys

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