PRECORE ADVANCED PRE WORKOUT POWDER BY VITACORE

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  • 3200 mg of Beta-alanine – a well-studied acid buffer at an efficacious dose, which will lower muscle soreness and increase workout volume
  • 350 mg of Caffeine Complex – caffeine plus di-caffeine malate provides a powerful surge of energy up front and long-lasting energy with no crash or stomach issues
  • 500 mg of N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine – a precursor of dopamine specifically designed to cross the blood brain barrier for enhanced mental ability and neurochemistry
  • 1000 mg of Agmatine Sulfate – powerful nitric oxide activator, leading to vasodilation and huge pumps
  • 1000 mg of Glycerol Monostearate – strong osmolyte which volumizes muscle cells, leading to intense pumps and muscular restructuring and growth
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Product Description

PRECORE ADVANCED PRE WORKOUT POWDER is the most advanced hard hitting pre workout powder to hit the market .Every athlete likes to have a boost when they step into the gym to ensure that they can push their body to the limit. A solid pre-workout can fulfill this role by providing three major benefits: powerful energy, skin-tearing pumps, and laser focus.

VitaCore has formulated PreCore to demolish expectations and deliver a state-of-the-art pre workout guaranteed to satisfy. Hours of energy are delivered through a caffeine complex that provides both immediate and long-lasting energy. Nitric oxide boosters and cell volumizers will generate pumps that you can feel. The best part may be the unbelievable focus from the matrix of neuro enhancers that will precisely activate adrenaline and other catecholamines. Many of them, like 2-Aminoisoheptane and rauwolscine, double as fat burners as well, so you will get those benefits as an added bonus!The precise combination of ingredients will deliver the energy and pumps you expect from a cutting-edge pre-workout.

The secret success of PreCore may be the superhuman focus that comes from select neuro enhancers, such as 2-aminoisoheptane. This all-natural plant-derived molecule increases attention and focus while suppressing the appetite, so you can power through that workout without having to stop for a sip or a bite. With PreCore in your arsenal, nothing will stand between you and your maximum gains!

Niacin:
Niacin is a form of Vitamin B3. Vitamin B3 is found in many foods including yeast, meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, beans, and cereal grains.

• Niacin promotes health in the nervous system, digestive system, skin, hair and eyes.
• Niacin has long been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or the “good,” cholesterol. HDL cholesterol helps sweep up low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or the “bad,” cholesterol, in your bloodstream.
• Niacin also helps improve liver function, metabolize food, and helps your adrenal glands produce sex and stress hormones.
• Niacin is also known for increasing blood circulation.
• Blond et al. discovered in 20 men without diabetes but with dyslipidemia, 2g niacin supplementation over the course of eight weeks promoted a reduction in triglycerides (28%) and vLDL (68%) while increasing HDL cholesterol (17%).

Potassium:

Potassium is a mineral found in varying amounts in almost all foods.

• It is needed for building and keeping strong bones.
• It also helps control the amount of calcium in the body and urine.
• If potassium levels get too high or too low, the heart and nervous system completely shut down. Many people in the U.S. often fail to obtain optimal amounts of this nutrient, and pay a health cost for it.

Beta Alanine:

Beta Alanine is an amino acid that is used to enhance muscular endurance. Reports of increased rep range are common. Also, the benefit is highly noticeable in moderate to high intensity cardio.

• Beta-Alanine’s effectiveness comes through boosting the synthesis of carnosine. Carnosine acts as an intra muscular buffer to keep the pH from dipping too low during a workout. To keep muscular strength through a workout, you need to have your pH levels optimal. If they drop too low, you have significantly less strength and fatigue quicker.
• Beta-Alanine synthesizes to carnosine which helps keep your pH levels in check by absorbing positive hydrogen molecules (H+) that are produced during periods of heavy exercise. By absorbing the H+ produced by strenuous exercise, your muscular pH levels are kept at an optimal level which will allow you to train harder and longer!
• A recent meta-analysis confirmed the ergogenic effect of beta-alanine, showing a 2.85% increase in exercise performance compared to placebo when dosed at ~2/grams daily.

N-Acetyl-Tyrosine:

Tyrosine is an essential amino acid whose primary role in the body is as the direct precursor to thyroxine and to the hormones dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine.

• Tyrosine may improve both endurance and anaerobic performance via metabolic and/or neurotransmitter upregulation.
• Tyrosine also improves mental acuity, focus, and mood by increasing levels of catecholamines found in the bloodstream.
• A study done at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory reported that a dose of L-Tyrosine, when provided to sleep deprived subjects, ameliorated psychomotor performance declines associated with mental fatigue.

Caffeine Anhydrous:

Caffeine Anhydrous is simply caffeine with no water (around .05%). This has been shown to make caffeine anhydrous more potent because the body will absorb it more readily.

• Although caffeine can affect a wide variety of motor and mental functions it is most commonly used to improve endurance exercise, focus and cognitive performance, and improve energy levels.
• Caffeine has also been shown to have a thermogenic effect (heating/calorie burning) at rest and may increase the use of fats for fuel during exercise.
• According to the research higher doses of caffeine, in the 250-450mg range, are needed to provide an ergogenic benefit.
• In a study conducted by Astorino et al. (2010), active men given caffeine before resistance training were able to increase maximal torque, power, and volume by 5-8%.

2 Aminoisoheptane:

Also known as DMHA, 2 Aminoisoheptane is a DMAA-like stimulant found in Kigelia Africana fruit that works by boosting noradrenaline and dopamine uptake, while slowing down reuptake.

• DMHA has shown promising results in increasing energy, improving focus, and in some cases may elicit a feeling of euphoria.
• In animal studies it has been shown to increase pain threshold.

Rauwolscine:

Rauwolscine is a central nervous system stimulant that is classified as an alpha-2 agonist.
• As an alpha 2 agonist, Rauwolscine will block alpha-2 receptors. This results in the body releasing more norepinephrine – which gives you a feeling of overall well being.
• As a bonus to blocking the alpha-2 receptors – Rauwolscine may prevent the formation of new fat tissue.

Huperzine:

• Huperizine A is a selective inhibitor of the neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which means it prevents the breakdown and increases the amount of acetylcholine; an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system involved in cognition and muscular contractions.
• Multiple studies have shown that supplementation with Huperzine-A can enhance focus, memory and mood.
• A study conducted by Sun et al. (1999) reported that subjects who supplemented with Huperzine A for 4 weeks improved learning performance and memort compared to a placebo group.

Agmatine Sulfate:

Agmatine Sulfate helps improve nutrient partitioning which leads to an increase in muscle glycogen (carbs stored in muscle tissues) which then leads to more water retained WITHIN the muscle. This creates a fuller look to the muscles and a greater pump while hitting the iron.

• Agmatine Sulfate also increases NO production by working as a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme NO Synthase.
• There are studies to suggest that the nutrient partitioning effects of agmatine sulfate are possibly due to its ability to increase the insulin response to carbohydrates. This could be further explained by the increased blood flow to the muscle that occurs with increased NO production.
• LH and GH levels have been shown to be increased through the effects of Agmatine Sulfate and its possible effects on the hypothalamus.
• Agmatine has also been shown to manipulate pain receptors which may allow you to train past normal pain thresholds.

Glycerol:

Glycerol (1,2,3-propanetriol) is a colorless, odorless, sweet tasting sugar alcohol. When consumed glycerol is rapidly absorbed primarily in the small intestine, distributed equally among all fluid compartments, and promotes hyperhydration by inducing an osmotic gradient.

• This brings potential benefits for endurance and stamina events, including adaptation to environmental heat/humidity stress, along with promoting blood flow associated with resistance training.
• Glycerol has also been shown to help athletes store extra water, delaying the need for hydration. This suggests improved efficiency in exercise, thermoregulation and decreased physiological stress.
• In addition, glycerol enhances plasma and intramuscular volume expansion, producing a more engorged muscular appearance.

L-Taurine:

Taurine, has a myriad of benefits. From helping the body to metabolize fat, improving insulin sensitivity, raising testosterone levels, as an antioxidant, higher performance and quicker recovery during athletic training and increasing cardiovascular health… it goes without saying that Taurine is a great ingredient to have in your wheelhouse.

• Zhang et al. (2004) found that individuals who supplemented with taurine for 1 week before an exhaustive exercise bout significantly improved time to exhaustion, VO2 max, and maximal workload. It also decreased exercise induced DNA damage.

Q: What is the best way to take PreCore?
A: As a dietary supplement take 1 Scoop 20 minutes prior to your strength training workout

Q: I see a full serving of PreCore has 350mg of caffeine. Is that amount safe?
A: Generally speaking, yes. A large review by the European Food Safety Authority concluded that a daily safe dose of 400mg is safe for adults. We suggest not taking any other stimulants (like coffee) on the days you take PreCore. We also recommend starting with a half scoop to assess your tolerance before moving on to a full scoop.

Q: What is an ergogenic aid?
A: In regards to supplements, an ergogenic aid is any substance or ingredient that can improve exercise performance. Ergogenic aids can increase strength, improve endurance, and enhance focus, among other things. PreCore is loaded with 11 different ergogenic aids proven to give you an advantage when working out.

References : 

Niacin:
1. Elam, M. B., Hunninghake, D. B., Davis, K. B., Garg, R., Johnson, C., Egan, D., … & ADMIT Investigators. (2000). Effect of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein levels and glycemic control in patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial disease: the ADMIT study: a randomized trial. Jama,284(10), 1263-1270.
2. Goldberg, A., Alagona, P., Capuzzi, D. M., Guyton, J., Morgan, J. M., Rodgers, J., … & Samuel, P. (2000). Multiple-dose efficacy and safety of an extended-release form of niacin in the management of hyperlipidemia. The American journal of cardiology, 85(9), 1100-1105.
3. Guyton, J. R. (2007). Niacin in cardiovascular prevention: mechanisms, efficacy, and safety. Current opinion in lipidology, 18(4), 415-420.

Potassium:
1. Kanbay, M., Bayram, Y., Solak, Y., & Sanders, P. W. (2013). Dietary potassium: A key mediator of the cardiovascular response to dietary sodium chloride. Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, 7(5), 395-400.
2. Zhou, X., Zhang, Z., Shin, M. K., Horwitz, S. B., Levorse, J. M., Zhu, L., … & Pan, Y. (2013). Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure. Hypertension, 62(2), 288-294.

Beta-Alanine:
1. Hobson, R. M., Saunders, B., Ball, G., Harris, R. C., & Sale, C. (2012). Effects of β-alanine supplementation on exercise performance: a meta-analysis. Amino acids, 43(1), 25-37.
2. Stout, J. R., Cramer, J. T., Zoeller, R. F., Torok, D., Costa, P., Hoffman, J. R., … & O’kroy, J. (2007). Effects of β-alanine supplementation on the onset of neuromuscular fatigue and ventilatory threshold in women. Amino acids,32(3), 381-386.
3. Smith, A. E., Walter, A. A., Graef, J. L., Kendall, K. L., Moon, J. R., Lockwood, C. M., … & Stout, J. R. (2009). Effects of β-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 6(1), 1-9.
4. Baguet, A., Bourgois, J., Vanhee, L., Achten, E., & Derave, W. (2010). Important role of muscle carnosine in rowing performance. Journal of Applied Physiology, 109(4), 1096-1101.
5. Trexler, E. T., Smith-Ryan, A. E., Stout, J. R., Hoffman, J. R., Wilborn, C. D., Sale, C., … & Campbell, B. (2015). International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12(1), 1-14.

N-Acetyl Tyrosine:
1. Benedict, C. R., Anderson, G. H., & Sole, M. J. (1983). The influence of oral tyrosine and tryptophan feeding on plasma catecholamines in man. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 38(3), 429-435.
2. Alonso, R., Gibson, C. J., Wurtman, R. J., Agharanya, J. C., & Prieto, L. (1982). Elevation of urinary catecholamines and their metabolites following tyrosine administration in humans. Biological psychiatry, 17(7), 781-790.
3. Agharanya, J. C., Alonso, R., & Wurtman, R. J. (1981). Changes in catecholamine excretion after short-term tyrosine ingestion in normally fed human subjects. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 34(1), 82-87.
4. Acworth, I. N., During, M. J., & Wurtman, R. J. (1988). Tyrosine: effects on catecholamine release. Brain research bulletin, 21(3), 473-477.
5. Neri, D. F., Wiegmann, D., Stanny, R. R., Shappell, S. A., McCardie, A., & McKay, D. L. (1995). The effects of tyrosine on cognitive performance during extended wakefulness. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine.

Caffeine Anhydrous:
1. Harland, B. F. (2000). Caffeine and nutrition. Nutrition, 16(7), 522-526.
2. Goldstein, E. R., Ziegenfuss, T., Kalman, D., Kreider, R., Campbell, B., Wilborn, C., … & Wildman, R. (2010). International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 5.
3. Spriet, L. L. (1995). Caffeine and performance. International journal of sport nutrition, 5, S84-S84.
4. Astrup, A., Toubro, S., Cannon, S., Hein, P., Breum, L., & Madsen, J. (1990). Caffeine: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of its thermogenic, metabolic, and cardiovascular effects in healthy volunteers. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 51(5), 759-767.
5. Hogervorst, E., Bandelow, S., Schmitt, J. A., Jentjens, R., Oliveira, M., Allgrove, J. E., … & Gleeson, M. (2008). Caffeine improves physical and cognitive performance during exhaustive exercise.
6. Woolf, K., Bidwell, W. K., & Carlson, A. G. (2008). The effect of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in anaerobic exercise. International journal of sport nutrition,18(4), 412.
7. Stuart, G. R., Hopkins, W. G., Cook, C., & Cairns, S. P. (2005). Multiple effects of caffeine on simulated high-intensity team-sport performance. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 37(11), 1998.
8. Beck, T. W., Housh, T. J., Schmidt, R. J., Johnson, G. O., Housh, D. J., Coburn, J. W., & Malek, M. H. (2006). The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on strength, muscular endurance, and anaerobic capabilities. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 20(3), 506-510.
9. McLellan, T. M., Kamimori, G. H., Voss, D. M., Tate, C., & Smith, S. J. (2007). Caffeine effects on physical and cognitive performance during sustained operations. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine, 78(9), 871-877.
10. Lieberman, H. R., Tharion, W. J., Shukitt-Hale, B., Speckman, K. L., & Tulley, R. (2002). Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during US Navy SEAL training. Psychopharmacology, 164(3), 250-261.
11. Costill, D. L., Dalsky, G. P., & Fink, W. J. (1977). Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance. Medicine and science in sports, 10(3), 155-158.
12. Kovacs, E. M., Stegen, J. H., & Brouns, F. (1998). Effect of caffeinated drinks on substrate metabolism, caffeine excretion, and Performance. Journal of Applied physiology, 85(2), 709-715.
13. Acheson, K. J., Zahorska-Markiewicz, B., Pittet, P., Anantharaman, K., & Jéquier, E. (1980). Caffeine and coffee: their influence on metabolic rate and substrate utilization in normal weight and obese individuals. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 33(5), 989-997.
14. Dulloo, A. G., Geissler, C. A., Horton, T., Collins, A., & Miller, D. S. (1989). Normal caffeine consumption: influence on thermogenesis and daily energy expenditure in lean and postobese human volunteers. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 49(1), 44-50.

Rauwolscine:
1. Perry, B. D., & U’Prichard, D. C. (1981). [3 H] Rauwolscine (α-yohimbine): A specific antagonist radioligand for brain α 2-adrenergic receptors. European journal of pharmacology, 76(4), 461-464.
2. Rockhold, R. W., & Gross, F. (1981). Yohimbine diastereoisomers: Cardiovascular effects after central and peripheral application in the rat.Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s archives of pharmacology, 315(3), 227-231.
3. Arthur, J. M., Casańas, S. J., & Raymond, J. R. (1993). Partial agonist properties of rauwolscine and yohimbine for the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by recombinant human 5-HT 1A receptors. Biochemical pharmacology,45(11), 2337-2341.
4. Wainscott, D. B., Sasso, D. A., Kursar, J. D., Baez, M., Lucaites, V. L., & Nelson, D. L. (1997). [3H] Rauwolscine: an antagonist radioligand for the cloned human 5-hydroxytryptamine2B (5-HT2B) receptor. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s archives of pharmacology, 357(1), 17-24.

Huperzine:
1. Zhao, Q; Effects of huperzine A on acetylcholinesterase isoforms in vitro: comparison with tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine and physostigmine.; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences; 2002
2. Ma, T; Huperzine A promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in vitro and in vivo.; State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University; 2013

Agmatine Sulfate:
1. Ahn, S. K., S. Hong, et al. (2011). “Effects of agmatine on hypoxic microglia and activity of nitric oxide synthase.” Brain Res 1373: 48-54.
2. Arndt, M. A., V. Battaglia, et al. (2009). “The arginine metabolite agmatine protects mitochondrial function and confers resistance to cellular apoptosis.” Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 296(6): C1411-1419.
3. Berkels, R., D. Taubert, et al. (2004). “Agmatine signaling: odds and threads.” Cardiovasc Drug Rev 22(1): 7-16.
4. Gao, Y., B. Gumusel, et al. (1995). “Agmatine: a novel endogenous vasodilator substance.” Life Sci 57(8): PL83-86.
5. Haenisch, B., I. von Kugelgen, et al. (2008). “Regulatory mechanisms underlying agmatine homeostasis in humans.” Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 295(5): G1104-1110.
6. Halaris, A. and J. Plietz (2007). “Agmatine: metabolic pathway and spectrum of activity in brain.” CNS Drugs 21(11): 885-900.
7. L-arginine stimulation of glucose-induced insulin secretion through membrane depolarization and independent of nitric oxide.
8. Keynan, O., Mirovsky, Y., Dekel, S., Gilad, V. H., & Gilad, G. M. (2010). Safety and Efficacy of Dietary Agmatine Sulfate in Lumbar Disc‐associated Radiculopathy. An Open‐label, Dose‐escalating Study Followed by a Randomized, Double‐blind, Placebo‐controlled Trial. Pain Medicine, 11(3), 356-368.

Glycerol:
1. Bartos, J. (2013). A uniquely optimized, highly concentrated powdered form of glycerol delivering next-level hydration and next-gen product potential http://astromicnutrition.com/HydroMax_WhitePaper.pdf
2. Riedesel, M. L., Allen, D. Y., Peake, G. T., & Al-Qattan, K. (1987). Hyperhydration with glycerol solutions. Journal of Applied Physiology, 63(6), 2262-2268.
3. Lyons, T. P., Riedesel, M. L., Meuli, L. E., & Chick, T. W. (1990). Effects of glycerol-induced hyperhydration prior to exercise in the heat on sweating and core temperature. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 22(4), 477-483.
4. Goulet, E. D., Robergs, R. A., Labrecque, S., Royer, D., & Dionne, I. J. (2006). Effect of glycerol-induced hyperhydration on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular functions and endurance performance during prolonged cycling in a 25 C environment. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 31(2), 101-109.
5. Montner, P., Stark, D. M., Riedesel, M. L., Murata, G., Robergs, R., Timms, M., & Chick, T. W. (1996). Pre-exercise glycerol hydration improves cycling endurance time. International journal of sports medicine, 17(1), 27-33.

Taurine:
1. Zhang, M., Izumi, I., Kagamimori, S., Sokejima, S., Yamagami, T., Liu, Z., & Qi, B. (2004). Role of taurine supplementation to prevent exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy young men. Amino acids, 26(2), 203-207.
2. BOUCHAMA, A., YUSUF, A., AL-SEDAIRY, S. U. L. T. A. N., & EL-YAZIGI, A. D. N. A. N. (1993). Alteration of taurine homeostasis in acute heatstroke.Critical care medicine, 21(4), 551-554.
3. Gwacham, N., & Wagner, D. R. (2012). Acute effects of a caffeine-taurine energy drink on repeated sprint performance of American college football players. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 22(2), 109-116.
4. Warskulat, U., Brookmann, S., Felsner, I., Brenden, H., Grether‐Beck, S., & Häussinger, D. (2008). Ultraviolet A induces transport of compatible organic osmolytes in human dermal fibroblasts. Experimental dermatology, 17(12), 1031-1036.

 

 

Nutritional Info

Additional Information

Size

250G [25 Serve]

Flavour

BOMBPOP, MANGO ICE, TROPICAL ICE